Place Ghantoos

screen(1), /etc/profile, ~/.profile, /etc/bash.bashrc and ~/.bashrc

For a while, I have been having problems with screen(1) on some of my machines. I am not the “colors in my terminal” type of guy. But unfortunately, when you get used to having “some” colors out there, it is disturbing to lose them when going inside a screen.

The problem was that screen(1) did not source neither /etc/profile nor ~/.profile when it spawned a new shell; only /etc/bash.bashrc and ~/.bashrc were sourced.
As I don’t like having my preferences included in bash specific files, they were all added in *profile (specifically in /etc/profile.d/).

In order to find the source of the problem, I just added “echo ” in the different files (the ones in the title on this post ;) ). And launched screen to see which files were actually sourced.

The solution was quite simple. Let screen(1) spawn its shells as your login shell using the $SHELL environment variable. Add the following to /etc/screenrc or ~/.screenrc:

# make the shell in every window as your login shell
shell -$SHELL

À bon entendeur, salut!

Cheers,
Ignace M

FreeBSD: keep root’s shell inside /bin!

I just upgraded my server from FreeBSD 7.2-RELEASE to 8.0-RELEASE.

The upgrade steps are very clearly stated in the FreeBSD 8.0-RELEASE Announcement.

Everything went as planned, until the penultimate step, where I was supposed to follow Colin Percival’s instructions and rebuild all my ports before executing the final: freebsd-update install.

Instead of rebuilding my ports, I just executed the last step (# freebsd-update install), which rendered *all* of my third party application unusable. This of course includes bash(1)! I was now unable to start a new bash session, hence unable to start new ssh connections, as my user’s default shell is /usr/bin/local/bash.

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Running Debian on a Samsung Galaxy under Android

I have read many tutorials that explain how to install a debian on the G1 phone (running Google’s Android too).

Here is a compilation of what I have done on my Samsung Galaxy (i7500) in order to get a root access and install a debian system on it.
1- Root access
2- Debian installation

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My first shot of NetBSD (5.0)

As I heard a lot about NetBSD lately, especially with NetBSD5.0 being released, I thought I would give it a try.

I admit, I had a preconceived idea of what I was going to face. I thought I would have to go a couple of time through the installer, try to understand how to use the partitioner, etc. But I was wrong. Ten minutes after booting up the iso image, my first NetBSD was up and running!

Even though all this documentation is available in the NetBSD guide, here are all the steps I went through to install my machine.

My installation was done using kvm-84 on a debian (testing) machine.

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Windows, botnets et vos données privées

Hello, it’s me again!

Dans un tout autre contexte, je vous propose d’élaborer un exemple d’insécurité informatique sur les machines Windows (XP ou Vista) qui sont branchées sur Internet.

Il y a quelques jours, des chercheurs de l’université de UC Santa Barbara, ont publié un rapport résumant la méthode de prise de contrôle d’un Botnet appelé TORPIG.

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Debian, BCM4328 and ndiswrapper

This is just a small post that may help those who are trying to install the wifi modules of a BCM4328 card on a debian OS using ndiswrapper.

The debian wiki explains very well how to install the necessary windows drivers using ndiswrapper, so I won’t go into details. Here are the main steps:

$ sudo apt-get install module-assistant wireless-tools
$ sudo m-a prepare
$ sudo m-a a-i ndiswrapper
$ sudo ndiswrapper -i /path /to/your/driver/DRIVER/bcmwl5.inf
$ sudo ndiswrapper -l
bcmwl5 : driver installed
	device (14E4:4328) present (alternate driver: ssb)

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Disable touchpad while typing on keyboard

I don’t know how you feel about it, but when my hand touches the touchpad “mouse pad” while I am typing on my keyboard, and changes to windows focus or the mouse positioning, it annoys me, A LOT!

So here’s what I did to get over this issue on my debian box. It shouldn’t be very different on other distributions. (I’ll update this post in case I ever try it somewhere else)

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My memo -cheatsheet- page

I have added a new page to my blog today. It lists commands/tips I collected over the past couple of month. I will be updating it every once in while.

Please don’t hesitate to comment suggesting/correcting commands :)

I hope this can be useful!

Cheers,
Ignace M -ghantoos-

Mounting UFS in read/write under Linux (debian)

A week ago, I encountered some space problems on my FreeBSD system during a system wide portupgrade. Fortunately, I had backed up my system just before the adventure, so my system was saved.

The procedure I followed to restore my data, was:
1- recreate my partitioning, giving 10 more Gigs to the system, using the FreeBSD installation CD
2- copy all the data on it

Since I backed up my FreeBSD system on an external ext3 hard drive, I needed to copy it back from “outside” my freebsd system. My first option was to use Fixit from the FreeBSD installation CD set, but I had problems mounting my partition because of the inode block size of my ext3 partition. Bref. I decided to mount everything from my Linux (ubuntu) system, and copy everything back from there!

I only way to do this was to recompile my kernel with the right “UFS write” flag. And it JUST WORKED!! I copied back __ALL__ my FreeBSD system on the new slices, rebooted my machine, and here I am writing this post from my old-new FreeBSD system! :)

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Creating a .deb package from a python setup.py

This article has been updated on July 2nd 2009.

As I worked on packaging a project I am working on (Limited Shell) I found my self reading many tutorials on how to build debian packages. But none where related to distutils setup.py. As a nice setup.py natively knows how to package RPM, I thought about a way to include setup.py in a .deb generation.

Here is a small guide to help generate a debian package from a distutils/setuptools setup.py.

The main steps of this procedure are:
1- make sure that your setup.py is functional
2- generate a GPG key to sign your package and a public key to put on your server or wherever
3- create the files that are useful for the debian packaging:
* debian/changelog
* debian/compat
* debian/control
* debian/copyright
* debian/rules
* debian/watch
4- write the Makefile
5- generate your debian package
6- check your files’ licensing
7- check your new package using lintian
8- Conclusion
9- Links

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